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20131105
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, you have to look at the environment, mal pesticides. >> from her farm koby gathers male sperm from drones that can survive harsh conditions and will inseminate queens showing resistance to pests. fitness. >> the process is quick. it does take a lot of squeezing to get enough sperm for insemination. >> i'll role the fingers. >> that's the semen. >> you can see the >> it placed in a tube. >> how much will you give her. >> one turn, 10 microlitres. basically 10 drones worth. the goal is to have - i want gentle productive bee, but bees resistent to pests and problems we have, which is a tall order. i'll spend the rest of my life trying to do that. >> koby is not alone. in paulman washington, members of her team are breeding the >> >> what are these? >> voucher specimens. this is egypt collected in 1998, and bees from australia. >> for years they've gathered diverse stocks of bee sperm from italy, turkey and the kauk cos mountains to build diversity. >> this is the isolated mating station. we use it to control the mating of the bees. the colonies that have the males that we want for the
. >> which is not what it is in the criminal environment. >> exactly. in the criminal environment it's beyond a reasonable doubt which is somewhere up in the 90s, so there is a vast difference between the two, and essentially universities are making decisions on a .01 margin of error. >> it's 50% plus a little bit that we believe? >> yes. >> and is this an established principal of a federal guideline or up to an individual university? >> it was mandated in 2011 by the office for civil rights at the department of education, and they decreed that in sexual assault cases the proper standard was preponderance of the evidence, and the problem is if universities don't follow the director, they stand the possibility of losing federal funding. >> so by this you refer to title 9. >> yes. >> and we have reported on title 9 as well. title 9 guarantees them a safe, secure, protected environment by the universities, and from their point of view, universities should lose their funding if they are not protecting women equally. >> absolutely. universities have a very important role to play in this. they need
's knives and weapons. and there's also law enforcement. so this environment for me was very, very dangerous, and it wasn't conducive for me in rehabilitation. so you know, that was very -- with my experience, it was very -- a difficult situation for me. >> jody you're the co-founder of a victims rights group it is called the national organization for the victims of lifers. tell me why you started this organization. >> the reason why we started this organization was back in 2006, well, for me personally i woke up on a sunday morning to a news, my sister calling me asking if i had seen the morning newspaper which the headline read, second chances for juvenile offenders or something on that order and had the pictures of the offenders in my county that were convicted of first degree murder. and sentenced to life without parole and it was talking about legislation, movement to give them a second chance. i immediately tried figuring out what that was all about and through that process i came across jennifer jenkins bishop in illinois, mage in california, and we got together as a support group and
of the environment and in trees. that's gluing the mushrooms on to the side of the tree or the forest floor. >> do you guys grow your own mushrooms. >> we never grow mushrooms, we keep the mycilian in a vegetative stage. the concept was when i saw mysilian growing through wood ships, keeping them together. using waste didn't happen until i teamed up with gavin. >> it takes seven days for a product to be grown. we are about to show you how it works in seconds. >> what is this. >> the waste is cleaned, light before adding the mycel. >> um. it's ipp cubated and it becomes a solid white mass. next it goes through a tromell, a machine that grind the waste. >> this is reminding me of willie wonga and the chocolate factory and i'm afraid i'll be sucked up. >> this is mulched and stacked into moulds. the mycelian does what it does - gross. all that is left is to paying it at a low temperature of 200 to stunt the growth. >> freshly based funk us. so it can be sold to corporations like dell computers and other fortune 500 companies. >> here is what is cool. i can take the material, bury it in my yard and wi
: "kiwis love to bring people over here, show them their environment and try to scare... scare people to death while they're here" (laughs). ♪ schwartz: tour guide steve latham loves adventure. he's made a life out of it. steve latham: "i basically just left home when i was 17 and started hitchhiking around the country. learnt a lot about new zealand while i was doing that, then wanted to carry on with that and somehow make a living out of just being a new zealander, showing people how beautiful it was". schwartz: but new zealand has beauty with bite. too often in recent years, adventure has turned to deadly misadventure. queenslander, scott ashcroft is hoping that won't happen today. steve latham: "it's a very special day today isn't it? why is it a very special day? whose birthday is it? scotty's birthday! and one thing about scotty is that he's scared of heights - so as a birthday present we are going to throw him off a 134 metre bridge. what do we think of that idea?" tourists: (shout) "awesome!" schwartz: "so you're afraid of heights?" scott ashcroft: "i am, yep". schwartz: "wh
is the cheap money. the low interest rate environment spurred investors to borrow more on margin, we can see it in the numbers. it's showing that. this is increasing as we see the highs. we've been on the bottom since 2009, and stocks have been growing, which is good. it may be getting ahead of itself. we may be facing a correction. >> yes, but what if the fed cuts back on the cheap money that you are talking about? does the bottom fall out of the markets? >> nobody can say for sure. that's the scenario throughout time. ironically we are celebrating the 84th anniversary of the 1929 stock market crash. there are lessons to be learnt. when we see a build-up of people borrowing money, it gets to an infor example point where it can't continue and we see a steep sell-off. that could be where we are headed. >> we have good earnings reports recently. you see the sort of contradiction where consumers say, "i'm bes mistic about the economy, but investors see the markets going up and up. is there a contradiction. is there a problem with that? >> there really is, because it's floating on hot air. if w
that they were consuming, the environment they were living in, and it was truly a binge drinking environment. they were very open about, and that does give leeway to an occasion where people can be vulnerable. but they are going to be vulnerable on both sides of that equation. the men and the women as well. both sides if you have been subjected to a great deal of intoxication are going to be vulnerable to very unfortunate conclusions. >> yeah, i have seen numbers that as many as three-quarters of the rapist are people who have been drinking heavily. now you think this substantially underreported and you have learned of others who have suffered from this and who hadn't talked about it. >> yeah, and like what joie was saying, rape is not a knew problem. it's not that it's new. it's that we are finally connecting and have the language to speak out about it. social media has given us an entirely new platform to connect with survivors across the country. >> and beyond that there is such a shame in coming forward. it couldn't have happened to you or at a place as safe as carolina or any other scho
can go to college and be different than the environment that you come from. so it's all being a foster parent is being being impactful in a young person's life. >> rick, it's estimated that about 80% of the kids in foster care have serious emotional problems. your wife is a child psychotherapist. >> yes. >> you know, the two of you have a lot of resources at your disposal. you raised three songs, three biological songs. >> yes. >> even with all of that, were you prepared for what you faced and are most people equipped to deal with the kinds of kids that they end up taking in? >> unfortunately -- unfortunately, the system ends up confronting reality. we had every advantage. we did have the resources and my wife had the expertise and the patience. we had a greater than environment where we could take multiple kids, all siblings at once. it was very trying in certain circumstances. we had kids pull knives on us. we had kids who were really, really dysfunctional and made it very tough to reach them. but i think that the comment that was just made about showing that love and patience, the p
'm investigating the impact that illegal sand mining, is having on the environment and people's lives. ♪ argentina's ruling party has kept control of congress in mid-term elections but opposition has made major gains and there was a party losing seats in four major district and result end her chances of changing the constitution to allow her to stand for a third term. and we are in buenos aries. >> reporter: putting on a brave face, supporters of the ruling party celebrated and sunday's mid-term elections confirmed they lost in key districts throughout the country. >> translator: we will continue building the dream of a better argentina said the vice president defiantly. >> reporter: in the province which has 40% of votes nationwide the president former chief of staff now a rival beat the government star candidate for congress. and she business friendly than the president is already being mentioned as a possible front-runner for the 2015 presidential race. >> translator: let's open our arms and respect our differences which is the only way to build a country. >> reporter: this election was clea
pistol shooting, and new environment, laser shooting, this was another big step. then a combination of shoot and run, this gives another exciting moment. >> how important is it for sport that you continue to have olympic recognition? >> you know the point is we are an elite sport. to run the five disciplines, to participate in pent@lon i pent s you need quite a bit of intelligence. we're not a mass sport, we are an elite sport. so if you are not in this box of olympic -- under the olympic rings, it will be very difficult to convince a government to support you. >> this event, the champion of champions, brought together the top talents in the sport. frenchman christophe pat winning. >> this day is my day, fencing is good. and it's easy for me. >> so with its olympic status assured the bosses say the priority now will be to raise modern pentathalon with these, al jazeera doha. rm. >> well, the very chilly start in the northwest, winter storm on the move. while in the east coast look at mostly clear skies. it's a beautiful day to say the least. especially new york city battery park, if
for assuring a permissive environment for our inspectors do the work. they have done that. and in these cases where the two sites we did not visit, that is the kind of negotiation that the un mission in damascus does as part of this joint mission with the opcw. >> michael. thank you for joining us. congratulations by the way on the nobel. >> thank you very much. >>> a senate taking a closer look at the situation in syria. he talked to lawmakers about the state of the regime and opposition. >> the regime is suffering serious manpower shortages, for that reason it has brought in foreign fighters from hezbollah, and even iraqi shiite militia men. the opposition that we support is fighting on two fronts both against the regime and extremists directly linked to al-qaeda and iraq. >> ambassador ford also testifying about how the u.s. can best support the syrian revolution, he said it will wear on. >>> iraqi's superintendent making his first visit to washington in a couple of years, and he is asking for help. mike viqueira joins us live from washington. mike the prime minister speaking at the u.s. i
conversations about your life. i knew if i created a almost 60 minutes-like style environment and approached it like a journalist which is what i am by trade, they would take what i was asking and doing seriously. >> it was an approach to a tempt to get the truth from them and hopefully not have them dodge the difficult questions i was going to ask. it was only after a period of time after i showed this footage to other journalists and friends of mine that do make films said it's an intriguing story. when you go to talk to your brothers and sisters and other members of the community you should take a camera along. and i di did and it shaped up ta story i could tell. >> it's a fascinating story for you and your family. steve thanks very much for being with us here. >> thank you. steve's documentary, "open secret" will air sunday night at 9:00 on al jazeera america. >> fascinating non-verbal communication meets the fire of indian dance. they are moves to take decade to master we'll meet the revere ed (vo) gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. tonight: it seemed like a norm
're a doctor. if you're a medical professional going into this environment where is your responsibility? >> your responsibility is to the patient. it's first and foremost, and it is, in fact, what is most important even in accomplishing the military mission because military physicians come in with an allegiance to this country and take an oath. they are there to serve and keep the force fit and healthy so it can do its job. that is grounded, and you keep the interest of your patient first and foremost. >> i want to hear about force feeding. what does that feel like? what is the process. >> the process of forced feeding is a tube, there are several sizes, it passed through the nose into the throat and into the stomach. there is gel put on t and there is sometimes an anesthetic with it. in terms of how comfortable it is, it varies a lot because people have different gag reflexes. after several times people do get used to it. once the tube is past and you're sure it is in the stomach, then the food, the nutrient, usually ensure, is poured in after an hour. >> the alternative is what, if yo
. >> the report suggests the security environment remains difficult and unprepredictable. how has the u.n. inspections team been able to cope with that problem? >> it is difficult and unpredictable, that's why they have not gotten to those two sites that you mentioned in the beginning. because those sites can't be secured. the yrnlings government is helping in providing that, the u.n. has got some security in there it's not over yet, and i don't know whether we'll actually get to those sites splongs the war continues. -- as long as the war continues. but that raises the other truly significant political question. i'm sure john knew and i'm sure other people reading reports in recent days have been just as report as i have been about the state of affairs at the consequence of the war, the emergence of polio and so on. what is desperately needed is to build on this weapons agreements, get that peace schedule underway and see if an end can be brought to the true sears seersyrian questions. >> we have talked to a journalist in syria who has been bringing us reports and pictures of the devas
that the security environment remains difficult and unpredictable. it seems to me how has this - u.n. inspection teams been able to cope with that problem? >> well, it is difficult and that's what i have not gotten to the two sites that you rightly mentioned at the beginning. those two sites can't be secured. the syrian government has been helping in providing that security. the u.n. has got some security in there. it's not over yet. and, you know, i don't know whether we'll actually get to those sites as long as the war continues. but that raises the other truly significant question. i am sure you and other people reading reports in rooent days have been just as horrified as i have been about the state of affairs as a consequence of the war. the people who were starving, the ememory eps of polio amongst children and so on. what is desparately needed it to build on the agreement that was reached on chemical weapons, and get that peace conference underway that is scheduled for about three or four weeks from now, and see if an end can be brought to the truly serious syrian problem and that's the c
(footballnames.ecl) environment especially for a young children that they get good education, and in afghanistan it's impossible for the kids, especially for the one who is working with the american for their kids it's impossible to goe go to the schools or kindergarten to get education. but for here there is no more fear of taliban to get my children or harm my children. i you can sen can send them to s or kindergarten for a good education. >> i saw somewhere you said that in afghanistan they would learn to hold guns. here they will learn to hold a pencil and paper. >> yeah. janis when he got off the plane last night i asked him, what does this mean to you? my kids instead of having to learn how to predict and defend -- protect and defend themselves, when they go to school they will be taught to hold a pen and pencil and piece of paper. >> janis welcom well to welcomed states. >> straight ahead the surprising pick for the most powerful person in the world. and mariel hemingway talks about millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. >>> up next is the golde
the head of dow chemical, they are here saying that america is a favorable environment for any foreign inning invest. they are talking about the low interest rates that the u.s. has. the low cost, relative low costs of energy and transportation costs. the one weakness that has been pointed out, is that america needs to do a better job training americans for the jobs that are available. for example, especially in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. some 600,000 of those jobs available right now, but no one is available to fill them. and so america's school system needs to do a better job getting people ready for the jobs that are out there. >> randall pinkston joining us live from woosh wash. randall, thank you very much. a iraq's prime minister also visited washington asking for help, saying he needs help dealing with the growing insurgency that has killed thousandthousands of iraqis thi. how is he describing little situation in iraq right now? >> reporter: he's making no bones about the fact that the terror has increased the number of deaths has increased dramati
. basically said, i'm going to kill you. and the player felt he wasn't safe in his work environment. so to call somebody soft because they don't feel safe, you know, that -- you just really can't comprehend why people who actually think that way, unless it was them actually being bull bullied i'm sure they would feel differently. >> incognito was voted an agitator since 2009 he has been a dirty player, oftentimes on opposing teams. what personality traits do bullies possess and what do they zero in on their victims? >> in terms of personality traits to be honest, you probably don't find many specific personalty traits that will differentiate a bully from just your typical aggressive football player. you know in terms of why somebody might act that way, they might look for weakness in another player. obviously, in richie's situation he was a veteran player and again it's not uncommon for veterans to give the rookieless a hard time. -- rookies a hard time. jonathan is not a rookie, he's actually in his second year. so why was he continuing to berate this guy in his second year? that's to
on the environment and people's lives. >> and welcome back to al jazeera america. here are the top stories this sunday night. a critical part of the affordable care act went down tonight. unclear how long it will take to fix that problem. >>> the syrian government has met an ambitious deadline, coming three days early, a critical step to eventually destroy syria's arsenal. >>> rock leader lou reed passed away at the age of 71. his agent said his death was related to a recent liver transplant. >>> nsa's strained transatlantic ties. a german magazine claims that the u.s. was tapping angela merkel's cell phone for more than a decade. >> when president obama spoke at brandenburg gate this summer, the u.s. was already facing tough questions about its sphainsurveillance programs. >> our current programs are bound by the rule of law and they're focused on threats to our security not the communications of ordinary persons. >> but apparently, the u.s. had been focused on the communications of official persons. der spiegel said that the nsa used high tech antenna to spy on government officials. gebl
the impact that illegal sand mining, is having on the environment and people's lives. >> reporter: and in sport find out if baseball beards bought the boston red sox to the end and we will have sports in about 35 minutes. ♪ and at the u.n. security council they will be talking about the situation in the eastern part of the democratic republic of congo later today after a peace keeper was killed there and three days of fighting and the army says it has taken over a number of towns in the province from the march 23, the m 23 rebels including the stronghold and finding between government forces and m 23 began on friday less than a week after the peace talks between the two sides broke down and the government and rebels are now blaming each other for launching the first attacks. and m 23 rebel fighters join the congo army in 2009 and defected saying they have been treated poorly and the government did not live up to the deal. and the group took over territory in the province and briefly seized the provincial capitol. there are allegations and both nations deny and we are live from p
, but in an environment like los angeles these things are a thing of the past. there is no way politically or even room-wise that we could ever build another landfill like this in a setting like this. >> reporter: which is why this place becomes even more important. puente hills also runs a massive recycling center that will continue to operate. from sorting to stacking, plastics, paper, cans, all set to be recycled. the hope is more centers like this one will be the future, and land fills like this one will be the past. >> when you look at what we're doing and where this industry is going to go, these are dinosaurs. >> reporter: still, the trash that has been come to go puente hills every day for the past 60-plus years has to go somewhere. eventually it will be trucked some 200-miles away to blythe, california. >> reporter: doesn't the trash then become another neighborhood's problem? isn't the whole idea not in my backyard move this community to another community? >> absolutely. and unfortunately the way those types of decisions are made, it follows the path of at least resistence. >> when land fills
of the art. it has state of the art technology. but in a environment like los angeles these are a thing of the past. there is no way politically we could build another land fill like this in is a setting like this. which is why this place is even more important. they run a massive material recycling center that will continue to o operate. from sorting to stacking, plastic, paper, kang cans all so be recycled. they are hoping that this is the future and land fills like this are the past. >> when you look at the where we are going and the industry these are dinosaurs. >> the trash that has been coming every day for the past 60 plus years has to go somewhere. so eventually it will be trucked 200 miles away to blythe, california. >> doesn't the trash become another neighbourhood's problem doedoesn't the idea of not in my backyard move from this community to another community? >> absolutely. and unfortunately the way those types of decisions are made, it follows the path of athlete leat resistance. >> when land fills shutdown like this and has to go further away there is a cost to that. >>
around someone saying, "come with me." teens who reach out to teens can foster a bias free environment. >> big day in boston, a lot to celebrate. darren haynes is here with the sports. >> after the red sox won its third series title in 10 years, today's parade held a different region - a time where trag di became triumph in boston. for the first time thousands of fans lined the city. parades started at fenway park and ended at the charles river. the red sox beat the st louis cardinals in six games to win a world title. >> the flyers lost 7-0 to the capitals. two goalies fought. they got into it in a game that featured 114 penalty minutes. >> and denver broncos head coach was hospitalized after feeling light-headed. fox was on a golf course, and was taken to a charlotte hospital. the broncos released a statement saying that fox did not preerns heart attack symptoms. the broncos are on their bye this week. stereo still ahead on al jazeera america. more on the u.s. drone strike that killed the head of taliban and pakistan. pakistan said the strike compromised peace talks. more on the thr
work tout teens can foster a bias free environment. sf >> hunger is on a lot of people's minds following the cuts to the food program. sculptures are being made from donated food. architects and students are competing to collect the best sculptures, and they are hoping to collect 9,000 pounds of non-perishable goods to hand out. all righty. time for sport with darren hayes. a little health concern with the head coach of denver. >> john fox was hospitalized after feeling light-headed. fox was on a golf course when he experienced symptoms and was taken to a hospital. the broncos released a statement saying fox did not experience heart attack symptoms. they are on a bye this week. >> after the red sox won their title, their parade was a time when tragedy became triumph. for the first time since the boston marathon, thousands lined the streets. it started from the green monster at fenway park, and ended at charles river. >> englands premier league stoke city's goalkeeper did something rarely seen - watch his back pass go down the field, cash wind and bounce high over south hamp ton
a almost 60 minutes-like style environment and approached it like a journalist which is what i am by trade, they would take what i was asking and doing seriously. >> it was an approach to a tempt to get the truth from them and hopefully not have them dodge the difficult questions i was going to ask. it was only after a period of time after i showed this footage to other journalists and friends of mine that do make films said it's an intriguing story. when you go to talk to your brothers and sisters and other members of the community you should take a camera along. and i di did and it shaped up ta story i could tell. >> it's a fascinating story for you and your family. steve thanks very much for being with us here. >> thank you. steve's documentary, "open secret" will air sunday night at 9:00 on al jazeera america. >> fascinating non-verbal communication meets the fire of indian dance. they are moves to take decade to master we'll meet the revered pair of role not els mod modelss dance. >> audiences are intelligent ♪ >> now on one of the oldest dance forms in the world choreographed by so
memory. we are in an environment when the next thing happens, everybody jumps on to the next thing. it depends whether more allegations come out. that's really going to be the primary determining factor and whether or not the president forcefully steps up and says look, this is what we're going to do to rectify this, which i think he will. >> hopefully the president's listening to you this morning and will do that. good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> mitt romney is slamming president obama over the affordable care act. the former republican presidential candidate said he's unhappy about how the president is comparing the rollout of the federal plan with a similar law he signed as governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts, we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow rollout. that way you could test the systems as you went looking for glitches. perhaps the most important lesson the president failed to learn was you have to tell the american people the truth. when you told the american people that you could keep your health insurance if you wanted to keep that p
plan to drill and protect the environment. aljazeera continues. we're back with with you in two and a half minutes. >> kathleen sebelius on the health care hot seat. all eyes will be on her as she gets set to defend the affordable care act and its problem-plagued website. >> there has not been a mass casualty in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. die i, saying the gathering of intelligence around the world is not only critical, it helps keep americans safe from terrorists. >> a new crisis in sir yes, children testing positive for polio. the latest outbreak could be the tip of iceberg. >> a bus crash in india, police searching for the company's owners. >> fireworks are expected an hour from now on capitol hill when health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius will appear before a house committee. that committee is looking into problems with the rollout of the affordable care website. she was optimistic in the weeks leading up to the launch. >> we're on track to have the marketplace up and running on october 1 and i'm confident that we will
-parents agree that teens reaching out to teens can best foster a bias free environment. >> the suggestion of paying for an organ don ag, it's cav yam. a study shows if people were offered $10,000 for a kidney it may be more cost effective leading to longer lives for the patient, cutting the need for donor ors gans. 18 people every day are waiting for an organ transplant. 2,000 names are odded to the lists every month. paying kidney donors $5,000 would threat to an increase in the list. if kiddy donations rose 20% it would rise to $40,000. >> joining us to discuss this is a doctor in calgary. thank you for your time, we appreciate it. >> how dire is the need for kidney donations? >> it's at a critical stage. more people are coming down with rehn although disease. the supply of kidneys is not meeting the demand. patients on dial sis have a poor quality of life and the survival is not as good as transplant. why has the supply changed? >> that's a difficult kevin to answer. end stage renal disease has several causes. one could be diabetes. people are living longer as well. >> ill dial sis hel
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)